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How recognized are you at your workplace?

August 7, 2013

”In the arena of human life the honors and rewards fall to those who show their good qualities in action.” Aristotle

notice board

While writing this post, I am reminded of an activity we once had during the “Thanksgiving” week, where all employees were asked to paste “Note-of-Thanks” on the work station of another employee who they feel, has inspired, helped, supported or motivated them in any way. At the end of the activity, while majority of the employees had gathered notes by their immediate team members (seems quite obvious), there were some  (the popular ones) who had received “Note-of-Thanks”  from employees of other team and departments, whom they never directly worked with, decorating their work station.

The activity involved the concept of “Workplace recognition” where employees were being recognized and acknowledged by their colleagues and coworkers, without the intervention from HR or Management. Those who had maximum number of notes were the employees who had gained substantial recognition for their work, performance, attitude and behavior.

When we talk about “Workplace recognition” or “Employee recognition” it is widely accepted as a responsibility that solely rests upon managers and employer to recognize their best employees. But aren’t we equally responsible for the recognition we gain at workplace?

To gain recognition, work on it !

While the actual recognition comes from others (Manager, employer, co-workers), we own the responsibility of our workplace recognition. What makes some employees more popular and appreciated than others is their ability to attract recognition. And if they can do it, you can do it too..

If you have been hard-working, start smart working

It’s true that hard work always pays but it’s the smart work that lets you stand out of the crowd of over worked and exhausted employees. Grow out of your designated role, take additional responsibilities within the scope of your work, and accept new assignment that can offer opportunities for growth and innovation. Let your employer and manager know that what you are capable of.

Don’t miss to connect with your co-workers

You don’t necessarily need to be an extrovert to do so, just be more reachable and open to people around you. Go out and be part of group activities, volunteer for campaigns, get yourself involved in activities that can help you connect with fellow employees. Let others know who you are and what you are good at.

Make yourself and your work visible

So you are the most hardworking employee of the team, always meeting deadlines and targets but still your work goes un-noticed. You are never considered for new assignments and promotions. Wondering why?…. Probably because you and your work are missing the required visibility. Don’t let that happen to you; take complete charge and credit of your work. Let your Manager, Management and co-workers know what you do and how efficient you are at your work…A little self-praise is no harm.

What your take on the topic? Do you agree that we are equally responsibility for the recognition and acceptance we receive at work?

 

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From → Everyday HR

One Comment
  1. Ugochi permalink

    Very inspiring, and yes, I totally agree with you, we are also responsible for our recognition in the workplace

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